Bachelor of Arts in Criminal Justice

criminal justice classThe major in Criminal Justice provides students with an academically sound understanding of crime, justice, and the criminal justice system. Students majoring in Criminal Justice receive a foundation in theory and research as well as opportunities for practical application through an internship within the field. This major is for students who may pursue careers over a wide range of criminal justice opportunities within city, state and federal jurisdictions - probation, parole, police, immigration and naturalization, and the FBI. The Bachelor of Arts major in Criminal Justice includes two semesters of foreign language study.

Strengths of the Criminal Justice Program

  • Prepares students for their careers through service learning opportunities
  • Full-year internship in senior year
  • Key academic tools necessary for graduate study
  • Dynamic, dedicated faculty experts in various fields
  • Students are challenged to read, critically think, write and articulate ideas and insights
  • One-on-one faculty mentoring is the norm

Learn what our criminal justice program offers

Criminal Justice Minor

A minor in criminal justice is available and requires students to take
20 credit hours.

Out of the classroom experience

Criminal justice students at negotiators training
Students from the Department of Sociology & Criminal Justice, along with alumna Holly George, were part of a hostage negotiation training program hosted by the New England Crisis Negotiators Association (NECNA) at the Brunswick Naval Air Station.

In the field

For each of the last three years, the City of Westbrook, Maine, hired a graduate of the Saint Joseph's Department of Sociology & Criminal Justice for its police force. Officer Steven Goldberg ’07, Officer Ryan Close ’08 and Officer Brian Olson ’09 serve the community, as does the Chair of the Department of Sociology & Criminal Justice, Dale J. Brooker, a Westbrook resident and member of the city's Public Safety Committee and Human Relations Committee. Furthermore, Saint Joseph's criminal justice majors have not only worked as interns for the police department but as part of a service learning portion of their criminal justice course they have helped to develop and distribute community surveys that assess community-police relations. Lastly, the department chair is working on a program evaluation that looks at the Family Team Meeting process that addresses youth-related issues like delinquency, teen pregnancy and truancy. This engaging college-community relationship helps everyone and makes a Saint Joseph's College education worth even more.

Real-world experience

Stacy Burton '10As a student Stacy Burton '10 of Westbrook, Maine, has done survey and statistics projects in both Portland and her hometown as part of service learning in the community. She also interned as a court recorder for the city of Portland.

Department wins Award

Sociology Department receiving Maine Campus Compact AwardCongratulations to the Sociology/Criminal Justice Department, which has been chosen to receive the President’s Leadership Award from Maine Campus Compact. The department is being recognized for contributions to community service, service-learning and civic engagement.

Conference Presentations

Criminal<br />
Justice Professor Dale Brooker and Brad Campbell '09 at Academy of<br />
Criminal Justice Sciences Conference

Dr. Dale Brooker from the Department of Sociology & Criminal Justice and alumnus Brad Campbell ’09 both presented papers at the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences (ACJS) Conference in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Brad is currently in graduate school at Sam Houston State University in Huntsville, Texas.